Nathan Freeburg

Nathan started running when he was 14. 20+ years later, he's still going. When he's not running, he enjoys exploring the city with his son, finding new restaurants with his wife, traveling, or backpacking. He loves dark beer, dark chocolate and dark coffee.Nathan currently lives in Portland, but works in Minneapolis and runs wherever he is. Favorite Minnesota running route is anything that takes him along the Mississippi River. Race Results.Nathan's day job is as a senior consultant with Leadership Vision Consulting in Downtown Minneapolis.
  • Great post Nathan; honest and interesting, and of course educational. I love the personal posts 🙂

    It’s tough when you don’t acheive your goal, especially when you aren’t used to it! i.e. PR’ing at every marathon so far is pretty sweet, but sub-3 is probably going to take even MORE focus and hard work, though I’m confident you can do it.

    You slacked on strength? You look strong in those pics!

    • frenat

      Thanks Jessie! I agree that it’s going to take a lot more work, but I’m excited to tackle it.

      Nathan

  • Sometimes failing at a goal is a good thing as it will motivate you and help you work harder. I had a really rough 2013 due to some minor injuries and failed at my goal twice before taking about 10 months to recover fully and train hard for my 2014 fall marathon. I used my failures to fuel my training and make sure it wouldn’t happen again.

    We’ve all been there and you’ll bounce back! Keep training hard!

    • frenat

      I totally feel that way Ben, thanks for the encouragement!

      Nathan

  • Sara

    Nathan, thank you for your brutal honesty. My advice is that sometimes you just need to let yourself grieve. And know that it’s ok to do so. We put so much of ourselves into our running that it’s natural to feel a loss when things don’t go how we hoped/wanted/planned. After an AMAZINGLY disappointing TC 1 Mile, I took some time to be upset. I tried to stay away from social media and running friends, and just let myself be sad. I contemplated quitting running. I did some yoga. And after about a week, I got over it and was able to Evaluate, Remember that Tomorrow is Another Day and Move On. But I do think that if I hadn’t just taken the time to be upset, it would’ve come out at some other point and I might have quit running.

    It wasn’t your day. Sometimes that happens. But I have no doubt that you’ll achieve your goal, no matter what it is, running or not. You are one of the most motivated, talented and ambitious people I’ve ever met. You’re also super-stinking nice. You’re allowed a temper tantrum every now and then. 🙂

    • frenat

      HA! Well thanks Sara, sometimes I do feel like I want to throw a little tantrum 🙂

      Nathan

    • Tomorrow is a latter day 🙂

      • Sara

        Jessie, you are my hero.

  • EricRinMpls

    Thank for sharing in such an honest post. I was off in Yellowstone on v̶a̶c̶a̶t̶i̶o̶n̶ some high altitude training and it was killing me not to know how the race went. When I finally got back to civilization to check on everyone’s results, I was so bummed for you – it was an amazing time, but I knew it probably wasn’t what you were hoping for. Thanks for the insights and motivation into your training cycle and race. I had a really rough run at the Lake Minnetonka HM this year, but was able to use the experience to bounce back a month later and PR at the Minneapolis HM. Some of the techniques you mention above played a big part in that outcome.

    • frenat

      Thanks Eric! Glad you were able to bounce back. That’s my goal as well!