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How you can Limit Injuries With Good Shoes

How you can Limit Injuries With Good Shoes

A nagging injury is practically a rite of passage in the running community. It may last a couple of days or a couple of months. Either way, injuries happen. What you do about it can determine the extent of your injury and how long it takes to heal.

I’ve talked about treatment options for typical running injuries in some of my previous posts, but sometimes these treatments aren’t quite enough. That’s when we need to figure out what else could be aggravating the injury. So, what about a runner’s shoes? The first thing I ask a runner with an injury is what shoes they wear and how old they are. Injuries can be a side effect of shoes breaking down.

A Simple Fix

Just the other day, I had a patient with lingering knee pain. It was so bad that it was bothering him while he was walking and running. His shoes didn’t have enough mileage on them to warrant a new pair, so we decided to go forward with some soft tissue work.

His symptoms improved after one treatment. He no longer had pain when walking but the pain returned a few miles into his run. So I treated again with the same results. When he came back in, he noted that his knee felt better until he went for a run, so I recommended he look into getting new shoes. I suggested he go to Mill City Running, which is a great store with great people. If you haven’t been there yet, you need to check it out.

They do a fantastic job of evaluating and fitting you for shoes. They can look at your arches, gait, and how your feet move while you walk. From there they can let you try various brands until you get one that matches how your foot is constructed.

Why Fit Matters

Long story short, the patient didn’t need anymore treatment, he needed different shoes. Now, it isn’t always that simple but sometimes it is. When you’re in the wrong shoes, it can cause unnecessary tension in other areas. If you’re having an issue that continues to linger, I suggest you go to one of the great local running stores and have someone see if you are in the correct shoe. Some stores even let you return a shoe within 30 days of purchasing. Some only allow you to return them if you run on a treadmill, but some let you run outside; be sure to check before you purchase.

Your shoes can play an important role in your health. I suggest you purchase your running shoes at a specialty running store. Stay away from the big box stores like Dick’s Sporting Goods and Sports Authority. The staff isn’t trained to fit shoes and they usually don’t have the best selection. If you go to a specialty store, you will get someone who cares about you being in the right shoe that will help you complete your training. Plus, I just enjoy supporting locally owned businesses!

Local Running Shops

We are extremely fortunate to have a number of great running stores surrounding us. Here are a few I suggest:

I know there are more than this but these are just the ones that have people working there that I personally know and trust to do a great job.

Where do you buy your running shoes? What are some other local stores I didn’t list?

Dr. Ty

Dr. Crabtree is a chiropractor in South Minneapolis at the Uptown Natural Care Center. He specializes in the treatment of soft tissue injuries and is certified in Graston Technique®, Active Release Technique® and Rocktape®. He uses these techniques to aid in the correction of soft tissue dysfunction that accompanies overuse injuries that are particularly common in endurance athletes.
Contact Dr. TY
Uptown Natural Care Center
2201 Hennepin Ave S
Minneapolis MN 55405
612.377.7760 | dr.tycrabtree@gmail.com
  • Bobbi Higgins

    I got mine at Running Room in Apple Valley. New shoes have made all the difference.